How parts of Ireland may be lost underwater in 10 years due climate change with Dublin & Limerick worst affected

A NUMBER of Irish towns and cities could be in severe danger of flooding in under ten years, according to the latest predictions.

A new UN report by the IPCC labelled “code red” by Taoiseach Micheal Martin revealed that human activity is warming the planet, causing rapid and widespread changes to land, atmosphere and oceans that are unprecedented for many centuries or even many thousands of years.

Many Irish towns and cities face severe flooding in less than ten years if changes aren't made

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Many Irish towns and cities face severe flooding in less than ten years if changes aren’t madeCredit: Alamy Live News
Dublin faces major flooding throughout both the county and city

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Dublin faces major flooding throughout both the county and city

Additionally, a report – published by Environmental Protection Agency, Met Éireann and the Marine Institute – revealed global climate change is having an affect on the country’s environment, which includes land, waters and atmosphere.

Some 15 of the top 20 warmest years on record have occurred since 1990 whilst the decade between 2006 to 2015 was the wettest on record.

A special map that allows users to explore sea level rise and coastal flood threats has been produced to show the effect of climate change on Ireland by 2030.

WHAT AREAS WILL BE AFFECTED?

Cork, Wexford, Limerick, Dublin and parts of Clare and Kerry look set to undergo the most substantial changes.

Howth will be majorly affected as the area could become an island of its own whilst it is predicted that by 2030, Donabate and Portrane will also be cut off from the rest of the country.

The likes of Fairview, Clontarf, Sandymount and the Aviva Stadium may also look very different whilst it is expected Dublin’s Docklands will even pass the front gates of Trinity College and the North Bull Ireland could be entirely underwater.

Cork City also faces serious flooding danger with the Marina Market, half of UCC, parts of Fota Wildlife park and the entirety of Páirc Ui Chaoimh predicted to be completely flooded in 2030.

Places like Cobh and Youghal are also at huge risk.

In Limerick, it is predicted Bunratty Castle, Shannon Airport and Adare Manor golf course will be completely flooded.

The maps reveal that the banks of the river Shannon will cause large areas of the city to be affected whilst half of the University of Limerick will be completely flooded.

Many areas in Kerry, including Listowel have been indicated as a risk whilst, on the South-East coast Wexford and Waterford will see their county lines reduced by the rising sea levels.

Dundalk and Drogheda will also see rising sea levels flood their banks.

NEED TO ADAPT TO CHANGES

The Climate Central said: “These maps should be regarded as screening tools to identify places that may require deeper investigation of risk.”

Speaking on RTE’s Morning Ireland, co-author of the report Dr Ned Dwyer said temperatures have increased by almost a degree over the last 100 years, and rainfall increased by six per cent.

He said: “We have to actually adapt to the changes that are kind of built into the system.

“So in Ireland all local authorities and sectors are preparing those plans so it’s looking at things like how do we ensure that our towns and cities do not get flooded, how do we ensure that our road and rail infrastructure is going to stay good and not either get melted because of heat waves or get flooded due to excess rainfall.”

Large areas of Limerick and Clare risk being completely under water by 2030

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Large areas of Limerick and Clare risk being completely under water by 2030
Cork city will be majorly affected by climate change

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Cork city will be majorly affected by climate change

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